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“A goal is a dream with a deadline.”

Napoleon Hill

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Thursday, July 18, 2013

VM will shows as powered off in VC, but you are able to ping and RDP to it.


One of the unusual issues.


Issue –   VM will shows as powered off in VC, but you are able to ping and RDP to it.
               If you reconfigure the system it will reflect in windows,

Cause – VMX will be locked with other hostname. (Vmotion failure may cause this)

Fix   –    Shutdown the OS from RDP and Power it on from VC.

 

Monday, March 4, 2013

ESX Host not booting properly

The problem was related to an abrupt reboot of the ESX host. This then caused the /boot partition to become corrupt.


I ran the following commands in ESX maintenance mode to fix /boot:

esxcfg-boot -p (reloads the PCI data)

esxcfg-boot -b (sets up boot information) esxcfg-boot -r (refreshes initrd)

Rebbot the server to normal mode.

Saturday, March 2, 2013

Configuring RDM's on VM Cluster Nodes.

Configuring RDM's on VM Cluster Nodes.

Add Hard Disks to the First Node for Clusters Across Physical Hosts


In an MSCS cluster, storage disks are shared between nodes. You set up a quorum disk and an optional shared

storage disk.

Prerequisites

Before you add hard disks to the first node, complete the following tasks:

 For each virtual machine, configure the guest operating system’s private and public IP addresses.

Ask your SAN administrator for the location of unformatted SAN LUNs. The hard disks you create in this

task must point to SAN LUNs.

NOTE Use RDMs in physical compatibility mode. The procedure below uses physical compatibility mode.

Procedure

1 In the vSphere Client inventory, select the newly created virtual machine and select Edit Settings.

The Virtual Machine Properties dialog box appears.

2 Click Add, select Hard Disk, and click Next.

3 Select Raw Device Mappings and click Next.

4 Select an unformatted LUN and click Next 5 Select a datastore and click Next.

This datastore must be on a SAN because you need a single shared RDM file for each shared LUN on the

SAN.

6 Select Physical as the compatibility mode and click Next.

A SCSI controller is created when the virtual hard disk is created.

7 Select a new virtual device node (for example, select SCSI (1:0)), and click Next.

NOTE This must be a new SCSI controller. You cannot use SCSI 0.

8 Click Finish to complete creating the disk.

The wizard creates a new SCSI controller and a new hard disk.

9 In the Virtual Machine Properties dialog box, select the new SCSI controller and click Change Type.

The Change SCSI Controller Type dialog box appears.

10 Select the appropriate type of controller, depending on your operating system.

Operating System Type of Controller

Windows Server 2003 LSI Logic Parallel

Windows Server 2008 LSI Logic SAS

11 Click OK.

12 On the Virtual Machine Properties dialog box, set SCSI Bus Sharing to Physical and click OK.

The virtual machine is connected to a public network and a private network with two virtual switches, and is

connected to the quorum disk on FC SAN and the virtual machine virtual disk on local or remote storage.

Add Hard Disks to the Second Node for Clusters Across Physical Hosts

To allow shared access to clustered services and data, point the quorum disk of the second node to the same

location as the first node’s quorum disk. Point shared storage disks to the same location as the first node’s

shared storage disks.

Prerequisites

Before you begin, obtain the following information:

n Which virtual device node is for the first virtual machine's shared storage disks (for example, SCSI (1:0)).

n The location of the quorum disk specified for the first node.

Procedure

1 In the vSphere Client inventory, select the second virtual machine that you created and select Edit

Settings.

The Virtual Machine Properties dialog box appears.

2 Click Add, select Hard Disk, and click Next.

3 Select Use an existing virtual disk and click Next.

4 In Disk File Path, browse to the location of the quorum disk specified for the first node.

5 Select Physical as the compatibility mode and click Next.

A SCSI controller is created when the virtual hard disk is created.

Setup for Failover Clustering and Microsoft Cluster Service

6 Select the same virtual device node you chose for the first virtual machine’s shared storage disks (for

example, SCSI (1:0)), and click Next.

NOTE The location of the virtual device node for this virtual machine’s shared storage must match the

corresponding virtual device node for the first virtual machine.

7 Click Finish.

The wizard creates a new hard disk and a new SCSI controller.

8 In the Virtual Machine Properties dialog box, select the new SCSI controller and click Change Type.

The Change SCSI Controller Type dialog box appears.

9 Select the appropriate type of controller, depending on your operating system.

Operating System Type of Controller

Windows Server 2003 LSI Logic Parallel

Windows Server 2008 LSI Logic SAS

10 Click OK.

11 Set SCSI Bus Sharing to Physical and click OK.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Killing a Windows service stuck in the STOP_PENDING state

Killing a Windows service stuck in the STOP_PENDING state


I ran into this issue when I attempted to restart the AdaptiveLogExporterService


Find below the steps to kill and restart pending service.


Example

C:\sc queryex AdaptiveLogExporterService



SERVICE_NAME: AdaptiveLogExporterService

TYPE : 10 WIN32_OWN_PROCESS

STATE : 3 STOP_PENDING

(STOPPABLE, NOT_PAUSABLE, IGNORES_SHUTDOWN))

WIN32_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

SERVICE_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

CHECKPOINT : 0x2

WAIT_HINT : 0x1388

PID : 1124

FLAGS :

C:\taskkill /PID 1124 /F

SUCCESS: The process with PID 1124 has been terminated.

C:\sc start AdaptiveLogExporterService



SERVICE_NAME: AdaptiveLogExporterService

TYPE : 10 WIN32_OWN_PROCESS

STATE : 2 START_PENDING

(NOT_STOPPABLE, NOT_PAUSABLE, IGNORES_SHUTDOWN))



WIN32_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

SERVICE_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

CHECKPOINT : 0x0

WAIT_HINT : 0x1388

PID : 4228

FLAGS :





SERVICE_NAME: AdaptiveLogExporterService

TYPE : 10 WIN32_OWN_PROCESS

STATE : 4 RUNNING

(STOPPABLE, NOT_PAUSABLE, IGNORES_SHUTDOWN))

WIN32_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

SERVICE_EXIT_CODE : 0 (0x0)

CHECKPOINT : 0x0

IPSEC fails to start with Error 2: The system cannot find the file specified

IPSEC fails to start with Error 2: The system cannot find the file specified


Upon rebooting a Terminal Server that had resource issues, we could not log back into the server through RDP. We could log in through iLO, and it was apparent that the logins were working but they were very slow. Upon examining the services, we could see that the IPSEC service was not started.

Trying to manually start the service gave the following popup: "Could not start the IPSEC Services service on Local Computer. Error 2: The system cannot find the file specified." The event logs also showed that TCP/IP was in blocking mode.

Disabling the service and rebooting restored all network communication, but trying to start the service would drop all connectivity again and slow down the server. I found another article that said that IPSEC may need to be rebuilt. When I looked for the registry keys for IPSEC, they were not there. After I ran the following commands, the registry keys were populated, and IPSEC was able to run properly.

To rebuild IPSEC, follow these steps:

1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.

2. In Registry Editor, locate and then click the following subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\IPsec\Policy\Local. (In my case, the server’s registry ended before IPsec. If this is the case, skip to step 6.)

3. On the Edit menu, click Delete.

4. Click Yes to confirm that you want to delete the subkey

5. Quit Registry Editor

6. Click Start, click Run, type regsvr32 polstore.dll, and then click OK.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/912023

How can I tell if the Microsoft sysprep utility has successfully run on a Windows

How can I tell if the Microsoft sysprep utility has successfully run on a Windows Vista* operating system?




Solution



The easiest way to determine whether or not Sysprep has run is to check the following registry location on the client machine:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Setup\State.



In this location there will be an ImageState string value. If this value shows as IMAGE_STATE_COMPLETE, Sysprep has run successfully. If any other value is shown, sysprep has not run or has not run successfully.



Another option is to look for the unattend.xml file in C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep. (Sysprep comes installed by default in Windows Vista.) If this file has a current date and timestamp then there's a chance this file was updated during the imaging process. However, the first option is ultimately the best choice.

Step by Step Guide to Extend C drive on Windows 2000/XP/Vista with Acronis DD

Step by Step Guide to Extend C drive on Windows 2000/XP/Vista with Acronis DD


Suppose we have four partitions C: 10 gb, E: 40gb, F: 60gb G: 48gb. We need to redistribute the free space 10gb on F: to C:. We will shrink the F: to be 50gb and then move the unallocated 10gb next to C: drive and then we will extend the c drive with the unallocated 10gb.

Acronis offers the most stable and confidence while resizing the existing partitions. Acronis Disk Director Suite can resize, move, split, merge partitions without data loss. If you want to merge partitions, you can follow this tutorial: How to merge partitions to extend boot partition.

Here are the steps:

• You can download free copy of Acronis Disk Director Suite.

• Check the partition space in disk management before we use Acronis Disk Director Suite.



Run Acronis Disk Director Suite and choose the “Manual Mode”, the right click F: to resize



Put the cursor to the left part of F: and prepare to drag F: to shrink.



Resize F to produce 10gb unallocated space and then click OK.



Right click E to move.



Click unallocated space and then click “Next”to move E to the right part of the unallocated space.



It will automatically move E to the right part of the unallocated space and then click OK.



We can see the unallocated space is next to the C partition.



Right click C: drive to claim the unallocated 10gb.



Put the cursor to the right part of the C drive and prepare to claim the unallocated 10gb.



Drag C to the end of the allocated space to extend boot partition and then click OK.



Click the flag to commit all the operations to extend the c drive.



Click “Proceed” to confirm all the operations.



Operations are completed.



Check the extended C drive in disk management.



Friday, June 25, 2010

Outlook file locations

The following is a list of data store and configuration files used by Microsoft Outlook. Some of the folders might be hidden folders. To view them, do one of the following:
Windows XP
Click Start, and then click My Computer.
On the Tools menu, click Folder Options, click the View tab, and then click the Show hidden files and folder option.
Windows 2000
Double-click My Computer on your desktop.
On the Tools menu, click Folder Options, click the View tab, and then click the Show hidden files and folder option.
Your configuration may not include all of the following files. Some files are created only when you customize Outlook features.
Outlook data files (.pst)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Offline Folders file (.ost)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Personal Address Book (.pab)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Offline Address Books (.oab)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Command bar and menu customizations (.dat)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Navigation Pane settings (.xml)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook\Outlook.xml
This file includes Shortcuts, Calendar, and Contact links.
Registered Microsoft Exchange extensions (.dat)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Outlook contacts nicknames (.nk2)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Rules (.rwz)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
If you upgraded from a version of Outlook prior to Outlook 2002, you may have a .rwz file on your computer hard disk drive. The file is no longer needed and the rules information is now kept on the server for Microsoft Exchange e-mail accounts, and within the personal folders file (.pst) (Personal Folders file (.pst): Data file that stores your messages and other items on your computer. You can assign a .pst file to be the default delivery location for e-mail messages. You can use a .pst to organize and back up items for safekeeping.) for POP3 and IMAP e-mail accounts. You can delete the file.
If you use the rules import or export feature, the default location for .rwz files is drive:\Documents and Settings\\My Documents.
Print styles (Outlprnt with no extension)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Signatures (.rtf, .txt, .htm)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Signatures
Stationary (.htm)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Stationary
Custom forms
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Local Settings\Application Data\Microsoft\Forms
Dictionary (.dic)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Proof
Templates (.oft)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Templates
Send/Receive settings (.srs)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\Application Data\Microsoft\Outlook
Message (.msg, .htm, .rtf)
drive:\Documents and Settings\\My Documents

wordle

Wordle: geekcomptips

http://www.wordle.net/
Wordle is a toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

"The address list could not be displayed"

Symptoms : If you attempt to address a new message from your Contacts, you may receive the following error message:
The address list could not be displayed. The Contacts folder associated with this address list could not be opened; it may have been moved or deleted, or you do not have permissions. For information on how to remove this folder from the Outlook Address Book, see Microsoft Outlook Help.

Cause : This behavior can occur if the Microsoft Outlook Address Book is damaged.

Solution : To resolve this issue, remove and reinstall the Outlook Address Book. To do this:
Start Outlook.
On the Tools menu, click E-mail Accounts.
Click View or change existing directories or address books, and then click Next.
Click Outlook Address Book, and then click Remove.
Click Yes when you receive the prompt to confirm the removal.
Click Add.
Click Additional Address Books, and then click Next.
Click Outlook Address Book, and then click Next.
Click OK when you receive the message to restart Outlook.
Click Finish.
Click Exit on the File menu to quit Outlook.
Restart Outlook.
In the Folder list, right-click the folder that you want to use with the Address Book (for example, right-click Contacts), and then click Properties.
Click the Outlook Address Book tab.
Click to select the Show this folder as an e-mail Address Book check box (if it is not already selected), and then click OK

APPLIES TO
Microsoft Office Outlook 2003
Microsoft Outlook 2002 Standard Edition

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